As a medical professional, you studied long and hard to prepare for a career in your chosen field. The training you have received has prepared you for a wide variety of situations. And when patients come to you, they put their trust in your knowledge, experience and best judgment.

You probably remember how as a new doctor, you took an oath, or made a declaration. You promised to serve others as best you can. You swore not to intentionally harm your patients. And you vowed to practice medicine honestly, with compassion and integrity. However, some situations could test your limits and raise questions about how well you adhere to these proclamations. For example, an accusation about fraudulent billing could put your career at risk.

Recent case of health care fraud in Texas

The Department of Justice recently convicted a hospital owner and internal medicine doctor for three counts of money laundering and 17 counts of health care fraud. Dayakar Moparty, manager of Red Oak Hospital, and Dr. Harcharan Narang, owner and physician at North Cypress Clinical Associates, allegedly submitted fraudulent and falsified claims for unnecessary medical tests or those which they did not provide.

Reports suggest that Moparty and Narang made patients appear sicker on paper to bill for higher reimbursement rates from benefit programs which include:

  • Aetna
  • Cigna
  • Blue Cross Blue Shield

Narang and Moparty each face federal prison sentencing for their participation in the $20 million scheme.

Consider the possible ramifications

Your actions have consequences. If you face allegations of participating in a scheme that could possibly lead to charges, it is possible that a conviction may result in the loss of your job and potentially your ability to practice medicine.

It would be wise to consider how your actions could impact your professional license, financial situation and freedom. Then, make sure that your billing practices adhere to the requirements of state and federal laws.