Most of what you post on social media is public domain. For the most part, throughout the country and in Texas, people post on social media without a lot of thought behind it. Often, social media is a collection of snapshots of a person’s life. You post what you want others to see. Unfortunately, this does not always mean that people post smartly. Some want attention, some think little about the content and click share too quickly. If you are in trouble for a drug offense, you may not think about social media as a problem. You should.

A New York Supreme Court Judge, as cited by Forbes, explains how incriminating messages on social media accounts are admissible. While cops cannot illegally obtain evidence or hack into your accounts, say that you talk to a close friend about your drug use or you recently posted a picture with drug memorabilia, the courts can use that against you. If you claim that the drugs were not yours, the courts may argue against you if there are any records of drug use on your page.

Now, this does not mean that you should try to delete your content in the middle of a trial. This may have negative consequences because the courts may decide that you destroyed relevant evidence. The best possible route is not to discuss crimes on the internet. Cops can use social media against you. Even if you have a private account, your friends or family can release this information to the police.

None of the above information is meant to be legal advice. It is for educational purposes only.