Stories of fraud being committed by people in Austin can often stir up emotion (particularly when those who are the targets of such accusations are seemingly well off financially). In such situations, it may be easy for authorities to turn public opinion against those accused by painting them as being motivated simply by greed (rather than considering alternative intentions behind a defendant’s alleged actions). Such prejudicial actions can make it difficult for one accused in such a scenario from being able to present their own case to a fair and impartial audience. 

A recent case in Florida serves as an example of how perception might unreasonably hinder the case of one accused of fraud. Federal authorities arrested the director of a heart and vascular health center for allegedly billing Medicare, Medicaid and private health insurers for unnecessary (and, in some cases, even phony) medical procedures. They claim that the doctor not only used the funds generated by this supposed to scheme for his one personal use, but also that his ultimate goal was to use the money to establish a personal empire in Ghana (with the hopes of becoming president there). The doctor has responded by pleading not guilty to the charges, as well as by claiming that any money he did send to Ghana was strictly meant to help support the country’s poor population. 

The image of a concerned would-be philanthropist and a greedy doctor (or other highly thought-of professional, in similar cases) certainly are at odds. Yet those presenting themselves as the former certainly have the right to have their claims considered. Working with a criminal defense attorney may help in ensuring that this happens.